October 25, 2018

"Fields End Freedom"

Harvested cornfield and corn bins, North Dakota
"As centuries, then millennia passed, the areas open for retreat [back to a hunter-gatherer way of life] dwindled, and farming culture became ingrained and habitual. The assumption of its  'superiority' has likewise become ingrained in us, its modern inheritors.This is the assumption that we now have to question. Superior it certainly was in most cases as the mode of production at the base of a new competitive complex — the militarized urban-agrarian state. But in terms of the quality of life for the general run of the population at the time of its introduction, as opposed to the elite? It seems doubtful. It must be remembered: fields end freedom. Whatever the astonishing subsequent achievements of civilization, it had a little-recognized price: humanity itself became one of its own domesticated species. We enslaved ourselves to conquer."

Chapter 5, "War and the Logic of Short-term Advantage."

2 comments:

Liam Northwood said...

I would like to share something really amazing with you ! I recently stumbled upon a cool new project called "Natures" on planting Paulownia trees.

Check them out:
https://www.facebook.com/standforgreen/

#Standforgreen

Chas Clifton said...

I would not recommend planting Paulownia in North America just because it is fast-growing. We have fast-growing native species enough.